There are several ways to contribute to the completion of the Atlas: 1) by adopting 'data custody' of individual countries, 2) by leading or joining the MtDNA project, and 3) by providing information about new studies or data.

1) The Atlas seeks individuals who are willing to adopt individual countries and to serve as data custodians for those countries. This task will involve keeping information updated and consistent with the latest primary research. Please contact the site administrator for more information and offers of assistance: haplo@xyvy.info.

2) The Y-DNA side of the project needs to be entirely reproduced for the MtDNA data. The Atlas is seeking a lead researcher to supervise this task as well as team members able to provide tactical support. Please contact the site administrator for more information and offers of assistance: haplo@xyvy.info.

3a) While an amazing amount of field research has been published in the past 15 years, there are still major people clusters for whom no Y-DNA sampling results have been published. In an effort to amalgamate and galvanize the effort, I have compiled the list below showing some of the more egregious gaps in our knowledge. Please be good enough to review the table below called 'Gaps' to see if you can provide data leads for any of these groups to: haplo@xyvy.info.

3b) Granularity poses a problem for cross study comparisons. As discussed in the risks section (methods page), some studies did not carry reasearch results through to the finer scales of haplogroup trees we have today. There are a number of haplogroups, Y, BT, DE, F, NO, P, and, to a lesser extent K (note: although K is macro group, most studies that provide K marker results also test for sub-K branches and thus we can be more sure the K categorization is determinate), that are actually macro-haplogroups in that they are branching points for several major haplogroups. The F marker, for instance, is found in all subsequent tree branch (G through T) individuals. Thus when we have a study that reports F as the haplogroup for a significant portion of Afro-Brazilians, such as in Abe-Sandes (2004), that could mean that the test subjects may belong to one of the other haplogroups that branched off from F or, in fact, that the individual has no other markers besides the F marker (unlikely). Genealogists often annotate this last case as F* (F marker present, but no subsequent markers present). At the moment we cannot be sure whether the Abe-Sandes, F grouped individuals are F* (negative for further markers) or F (indeterminate: no further markers tested). Along these lines but slightly less urgent is the need for finer scale resolution within haplogroups. Thus, for instance, we are using Underhill (2000) for the Japanese results, but this fairly early study leaves open the question as to whether the O categorization is O* or O indeterminate, and if the latter, we need to know which of the O subgroups (i.e., O2, O3, etc). Please be good enough to review the table below called 'Granularity' to see if you can provide data leads for any of these groups to: haplo@xyvy.info.

3c) Ecological footprint data is needed for the following nations: Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Brunei, Cyprus, Djibouti, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Grenada, Iceland, Kiribati, Kosovo, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated), Saint Vincent & Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome & Principe, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Tonga, Vanuatu, and Western Sahara. If you can provide any of these data please send to: haplo@xyvy.info

Gaps

Granularity


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